George Williams

4308947216_8db0679c94_b.jpg

Although constitutional, new laws to strip the citizenship of dual nationals involved in terrorism are more far reaching than first thought and flawed, writes George Williams.

Aboriginal flag

Noel Pearson has injected an important new idea into the debate on recognising Aboriginal peoples in the Constitution – that Indigenous Australians must have a voice in the lawmaking process, writes George Williams.

Voting

Momentum is building around the world to lower the voting age to 16 years. Australians this age, too, should get a say in decisions that affect their lives, writes George Williams.

Holding hands

It's been argued Australia should follow Ireland's lead on same-sex marriage and hold a referendum to bypass an unwilling Parliament. While the sentiment is positive, the idea is flawed, writes George Williams.

Western Australia

Every year or so, rumblings emerge from Western Australia that it might leave the Federation, however these threats are largely empty words, writes George Williams.

istock_000016987294_medium.jpg

Despite concessions for journalists, it appears the government and Labor have lost the appetite for further amendments to the Metatdata Bill, meaning it is set to join a long list of Australia's problematic national security laws, writes George Williams.

istock_000016264532_large.jpg

The Baird government's expert panel on political donations has made it clear laws in place for the NSW March election campaign leave open the possibility for corruption, writes George Williams.

Hicks hires 3 652x300 1

The Australian government's response to the quashing of David Hicks' conviction for providing material support to terrorism has been underwhelming, writes George Williams.

18 highcourt 1

Last week saw the swearing-in of Geoffrey Nettle as the High Court's 51st justice. But a dated rule means he must retire in less than six years, writes George Williams.

514916753 1

It's time to hold a judicial inquiry to come to terms with Australia's involvement in the use of torture after September 11, writes George Williams.

Pages