HIV

01_prep_pill.jpg

A landmark clinical trial led by UNSW researchers aims to halve new HIV infections in NSW within two years and 'virtually eliminate' HIV transmission by 2020.

01_world_aids_day_ribbon.jpg

Groundbreaking research from Australian scientists has prompted new international guidelines that will open up access to treatment and improve the health of millions of people living with HIV.

9_hiv.jpg

Scientists are now better able to predict how quickly the HIV virus will return after patients stop treatment following a discovery by researchers at UNSW and the University of Oxford.

Hidden_hiv.jpg

Researchers have successfully tested a new drug that activates hidden reservoirs of HIV cells in individuals on antiretroviral therapy, one of the first steps to eradicating the virus and eventually finding a cure.

17 HIVreport 2 0

The latest instalment of Australia’s annual report card on HIV, hepatitis and sexually transmissible infections has been released this morning. Here’s what UNSW experts who work in these areas make of the results.

HIV treatment.jpg

Despite high-profile health campaigns and a concerted effort to make antiretroviral therapy more accessible, the number of new HIV cases in Australia has remained stable over the last three years, writes Bridget Haire.

11_hiv.jpg

The proportion of HIV-positive gay men on antiretroviral treatment reached a record in 2014, but the rate of unprotected sex between casual partners also hit a historic high, new data shows.

latent_hiv_story.jpg

HIV cells in the body of a person receiving antiretroviral treatment become activated 24 times less frequently than previously thought, new research from UNSW's Kirby Institute shows. 

Dirty needle.jpg

The spread of HIV from injecting drug use in Australia has been contained, largely through the success of needle and syringe programs, according to a 20-year report released by the Kirby Institute at UNSW.

Early_hiv_treatment_is_a_win-win_strategy_david_smart_shutterstock.jpg

Starting HIV treatment early, before immune damage occurs, brings real clinical benefits. But taking antiretrovirals is a daily, life-long commitment and people need support to make the right choices, writes Bridget Haire.

Pages