Holly Seale

COVID-19 vaccine misinformation

Misleading claims about COVID-19 vaccines can negatively impact public confidence in immunisation uptake, a new UNSW Sydney study reveals. 

See, no crying or big needles, just a person of colour showing off his plaster

Our well-meaning efforts to use images to help demystify the vaccination process or share our pride in getting a COVID vaccine can backfire.

covid-19 vaccine vial ready for injection

Achieving high COVID-19 vaccine uptake among health workers will not only protect these critical staff members, it will support high levels of uptake among the public.

Unmarked bottles of vaccines and a syringe

The best approach for protecting everyone’s health will require us to provide different vaccines to different people according to need and availability.

Person receiving vaccine injection

A group of 28 vaccine researchers said we might have a vaccine by late-2021, though it could take until well into 2022.

Woman in isolation during coronavirus quarantine

It's easy to judge people who escape from quarantine as not doing their bit. But if we use some basic principles from behavioural science, we might stop people wanting to escape in the first place.

person being vaccinated

Church leaders have raised concerns over a COVID-19 vaccine produced using cells derived from aborted foetuses. But the Vatican has already ruled such vaccines 'morally separate' from the abortions.

A doctor draws an injectable vaccine into a syringe

Talk about a mandatory vaccine may not be necessary to get a positive response from the public, two UNSW medical researchers say.

coronavirus vaccine with Russia flag

If the vaccine does not protect individuals from infection, those who have been vaccinated could falsely believe they are protected.

adults hugging

How we perceive personal risk, and how well we comply with public health measures, can change depending on whether we are around people we know or strangers.

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