indigenous affairs

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UNSW Pro Vice-Chancellor Indigenous and former Referendum Council member Megan Davis will deliver a free public lecture on the role of truth and justice in constitutional reform at UNSW on 13 September.

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A simple referendum question about consitutional change would leave the parliament to handle the detail of how to give Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders a voice in the legislative process, writes Rosalind Dixon.

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In an edited extract, Megan Davis, Noel Pearson and Pat Anderson argue for a mechanism that will allow Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to participate more directly in decision-making in Canberra. 

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Commemorating events like Sorry Day is an important act of support for Indigenous Australians and demonstrates a genuine commitment to building community, a UNSW Sorry Day gathering has been told.

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As 300 Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islanders gather at Uluru, Harry Hobbs explains the role of this First Nations Convention in the process of constitutional reform.

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A symposium at UNSW on 26 May will commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Bringing Them Home report.

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Law Professor Megan Davis says it will be an honour in her new role to showcase and develop UNSW research across important areas of Indigenous policy, while nurturing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander scholars.

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Patronising racial stereotypes that laud Aboriginal peoples' natural sporting prowess are impeding the development of Aboriginal leadership in sport and its many flow-on benefits, a UNSW researcher has found. 

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A vote on constitutional recognition of Indigenous Australians is unlikely before 2018. But Paul Kildea warns that the longer the consultation process goes on, the more debate is likely to split and fracture.

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Like the young man shackled to a chair, it seems Indigenous people have little say in their fate, writes Louise Taylor. 

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