international law

a drug-carrying aquatic drone

International and Australian laws need to be updated to cope with the newest drug-trafficking technique threatening maritime security.

a poster of valdimir putin

Sanctions can be applied aggressively, but measuring their impact can be a challenge.

People march holding aloft a giant Ukranian flag

The fact that Russia is part of the UN Security Council's powerful P5 group of nations means the UN is in a tricky position when it comes to maintaining peace among its member states.

chip

US actions do more than just keep Huawei away from critical infrastructure. They choke off the supply of semiconductors to China.

The Strait of Hormuz.

States can’t pick and choose when to invoke international law for protection on a particular issue and then ignore, contravene or decry it on other matters.

beluga whale russian spy

Whether via a submarine or a whale, spying is a violation of state sovereignty, says Professor Natalie Klein from UNSW Law.

Statue of Liberty

Much that has been thought in the fields of law and policy seems to need rethinking. But what is to take its place? asks Fleur Johns.

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The building blocks for effective responses to people on the move already exist – states must simply choose to use them, argues Jane McAdam.

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The Turnbull government's proposed bill is cruel, punitive and may separate some families forever, write Ben Saul and Jane McAdam.

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The international law expert talks about her solitary, often nail-biting treks and why we shouldn’t mess with Mother Nature. 

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