Katharina Gaus

katgaus.jpg

Professor Katharina Gaus is at the forefront of deciphering T cell signalling, a critical part of the human immune system. Her research combines new super-resolution fluorescence microscopes and analysis routines to reveal the decision making process of T cells.

30_immune_receptors.jpg

UNSW scientists have discovered how human immune receptors become activated in the presence of harmful substances, paving the way for new technologies to fight against deadly diseases.

131219_unsw_147-edit.jpg

Nine UNSW researchers have been elected as fellows of the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences. 

hand2.jpg

Every second our immune cells make life or death decisions to activate or not. How do we switch these cells on? UNSW Professor Katharina Gaus investigates.

15 Kat Gaus 1

The molecular mysteries that allow cancers, viruses and autoimmune diseases to dodge the body’s defence mechanisms will come under the microscope at a new ARC Centre of Excellence.

131219 UNSW 125 Edit 1

UNSW has won four of 20 prestigious awards given to the country’s top health and medical researchers. The haul includes a particularly strong performance by female researchers.

Newsroom crop

Using a super-resolution fluorescent microscope, medical scientists are a step closer to understanding why and how human immune cells decide to activate or not, thus enabling or preventing disease taking hold in the body.

Microscope gaus inside

Using the only microscope of its kind in Australia, UNSW scientists have for the first time seen the inner workings of T-cells, the immune system's front-line troops against infection.

Kat Gaus inside

UNSW Research Fellow, Dr Katharina Gaus, has been awarded one of the world's most prestigious grants to look the cells which govern our sense of smell.