La Nina

A train line is reflected in the water of the Daly River, Northern Territory

Tree ring analysis suggests strong flows in NT’s Daly River can’t go on forever and water allocation could lead to environmental and cultural damage.

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After one La Niña, the Pacific sometimes retains cool water which enables a second La Niña to form.

Sad-looking spaniel sitting on a lounge chair looking out the window to a dreary day

Have La Niña’s storms got your furry friend feeling stressed? A UNSW Sydney animal ecologist gives advice on how to help them – and you – get through the dreary days.

Avalon rock pool in Sydney in stormy weather

With La Niña prolonging the wet season, there is an increased risk of flooding along the north, east and southeast regions.

Two stalagmites in Yonderup Cave, Yanchep, Western Australia

To look inside a stalagmite is to look back in time tens of thousands of years to see how the Earth’s climate patterns have shaped the world we live in today.

La Niña caused wet and cool weather conditions last summer

With more rain on the horizon in NSW and Queensland, a UNSW climate scientist answers our questions about whether we can expect more wet and cold from La Niña, and what’s in store for next summer.

Murray-Darling

The absence of climate drivers – specifically, the Indian Ocean Dipole and La Niña – explains why Australia has gone so long without heavy rains.

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Australian researchers, including from the UNSW-based ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science, have produced a remarkable high-resolution animation of the largest El Niño ever recorded.

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The projected upsurge of severe El Niño and La Niña events will cause an increase in storms – and extreme coastal flooding and erosion – in populated regions across the Pacific, a multi-agency study has found. 

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A new study has found that record high sea-surface temperatures off northern Australia were also responsible for the downpour that devastated much of Queensland in December 2010.