Two new strategic alliances between UNSW and Allens and the Law Society of NSW will aim to tackle the challenges of technological change and its impact on lawyers, law and the legal system.  


Depending on who you are, you could face a longer wait for citizenship in Australia compared to Germany, Canada or the UK, writes Sangeetha Pillai.

Human Rights

Concerns have been raised about whether Australia adequately protects human rights given multiple reports of abuses, including mistreatment of juvenile detainees, write George Williams and Daniel Reynolds.


Technology is rapidly changing the legal profession so lawyers need to focus on what they can provide that a machine cannot, writes Michael Legg. 

Statue of Liberty

Much that has been thought in the fields of law and policy seems to need rethinking. But what is to take its place? asks Fleur Johns.


The unprecedented conflict between George Brandis and Commonwealth Solicitor-General Justin Gleeson has potentially serious repercussions for government under the rule of law, writes Gabrielle Appleby.

unhappy girl

The long arm of the Australian law is finally extending to the cybersphere.


As drug cheats make waves at the Olympics in Rio, a new book - to be launched by former WADA chief John Fahey - investigates the legal impacts of doping regulation in sport.


A vote on constitutional recognition of Indigenous Australians is unlikely before 2018. But Paul Kildea warns that the longer the consultation process goes on, the more debate is likely to split and fracture.


Bret Walker SC, delivering this year’s Hal Wootten Lecture at UNSW, offered many examples of the way lawyers can and do play a role in politics.