lockdown

Melbourne city landscape

Economics tells us that governments privatising services where quality counts is a bad idea.

A person holding a house model against the sky.

Stamp duty reform is needed in times of crisis where for every day parts of Australia are in lockdown, billions of dollars are taken away from subsidies to the states, says a UNSW property expert.

Brisbane Laneway food market

Research suggests the coronavirus pandemic's greatest impact is due to people changing their behaviour voluntarily. So we may be overestimating the costs of government restrictions.

Sydney Opera House deserted

With COVID-19 spreading in Sydney's southwest, can New South Wales avoid a return to lockdown and a similar scenario to Victoria's second wave? The answer depends on whether there is community spread.

Melbourne tram

The best option is for infected people to be admitted to hospitals or other suitable health facilities. This will help prevent transmission within families.

A chalkboard with 'tax time' written on it.

A UNSW tax expert explains how small businesses can make the most of their tax return if they’ve worked from home during the pandemic.

A man looking at empty shelves in the toilet paper aisle.

Panic buying toilet paper is a quick mental fix that makes people feel more prepared and less anxious, says a UNSW consumer behaviour expert.

No turning back

It has been described as a once-in-a-century pandemic, but COVID-19 will cause a permanent shift in the way the world operates at the social, political and economic level.

Spanish flu

There are many similarities between Spanish flu and coronavirus, from school closures to mask debates. The story of 1919 also shows governments face choices that can have a terrible cost in lives.

closed sign

A realistic estimate of the economic costs of a two-year lockdown amounts to $90 billion. The benefit in lives saved amounts to around $1.1 trillion.

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