loneliness

woman alone on a swing set looking at a sunset

A better understanding of loneliness can help us identify when our social needs might be going unmet.

Happy senior couple in the park

Keeping up with friends into old age could help prevent dementia.

Teenagers and older adults interacting on the show

A unique social experiment bridges the gap between older and younger Australians.

Groups of people picnicking in park

When the pandemic hit, green space was there for us at a time when others weren’t or couldn’t be. Urban greening might be the solution to the ‘lonelygenic environment’ that our cities have created.

people socialising in a park

For the areas of cities with less than 10 per cent green space, increasing that to 30 per cent could cut the overall odds of residents becoming lonely by a quarter.

We're going to have to find more ways to connect with one another as physical distancing continues. Image: Shutterstock.

It is our collective responsibility to protect the most vulnerable from loneliness in the COVID-19 pandemic, says a social researcher from UNSW.

Ending the pain of loneliness in Australia

UNSW researcher Dr Sophie Lewis says health professionals can often misdiagnose loneliness as depression.