Marine Science

humpback whale opens mouth wide to show baleen

Baleen plates – the signature bristle-like apparatus toothless whales use to feed – reveal how these large aquatic mammals adapt to environmental changes over time.

Scenery from around the Thredbo River in Kosciouszko National Park

As the weather warms up, UNSW researchers name some of their favourite bushwalks and the ways citizen scientists can help them by collecting data along the way.

View over an ocean

In a UNSW Science Week event, Dr Ayana Elizabeth Johnson said the key to fighting the climate crisis is saving the oceans.

Pygmy blue whale swimming

It was the whales’ singing that gave them away.

Wild dolphins swim in the sea

A UNSW study shows airway bacteria can indicate the health of dolphins and whales ­– a finding that could benefit endangered species like the northern right and blue whales.

Humpback whale breaks the water's surface

UNSW researchers have linked the burden of humpback whales’ annual migration to depleted microbial diversity in their airways – an indicator of overall health.

3_barrier_reef_turtle_shutterstock.jpg

Scientists around the globe are in a race to create, select, discover and cultivate heat-tolerant corals that will withstand the next 50 years of warming oceans, writes Emma Johnston.

Emma Johnston

Renowned professor of marine ecology and TV presenter Emma Johnston is adding Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Research) to her impressive list of achievements.

Emma Johnston

When people think of science celebrities, they think of men. Emma Johnston argues that more needs to be done to highlight the role of women in science.

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