Mark Diesendorf

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Labor's policies have to get a lot more ambitious if they want to see real reductions in emissions.

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Twelve power projects are in the running for federal government dollars: six pumped hydro, five gas and one coal. It's clear which one shouldn't be on the list, for economic and environmental reasons.

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Here are some short- and medium-term strategies for transitioning to renewable, reliable and affordable energy in South Australia, writes Mark Diesendorf.

Nuclear power

The South Australian royal commission recommended the state investigate a high-level nuclear storage facility. But the costs don't stack up, writes Mark Diesendorf.

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The climate action movement can learn from Ghandi and Martin Luther-King as they look for new ways to force governments to take stronger action on climate change, writes Mark Diesendorf.

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The South Australian proposal to profit from the storage of nuclear waste would create a financial burden on future generations, and bring substantial environmental and health risks, writes Mark Diesendorf.

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Sustainability will be almost impossible to achieve without changing our values and ending growth in population and consumption per person, writes Mark Diesendorf.

coal power

The writing is on the wall for coal-fired power in Australia, writes Mark Diesendorf.

SA Power Station

South Australia's electricity system could be operated entirely on scaled-up, commercially available renewable energy sources, writes Mark Diesendorf.

Nuclear power

The case for expanding nuclear energy is based on a raft of myths including its status as an energy source, greenhouse gas emissions, accidents, wastes and economics, writes Mark Diesendorf.

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