Mark Diesendorf

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Sustainability will be almost impossible to achieve without changing our values and ending growth in population and consumption per person, writes Mark Diesendorf.

coal power

The writing is on the wall for coal-fired power in Australia, writes Mark Diesendorf.

SA Power Station

South Australia's electricity system could be operated entirely on scaled-up, commercially available renewable energy sources, writes Mark Diesendorf.

Nuclear power

The case for expanding nuclear energy is based on a raft of myths including its status as an energy source, greenhouse gas emissions, accidents, wastes and economics, writes Mark Diesendorf.

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The federal government is implementing an ideological program to terminate climate action and stop the growth of renewable energy in particular, writes Mark Diesendorf. 

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Why bother with emissions-intensive, expensive and dangerous nucelar energy when there is already a better alternative to fossil fuels: the efficient use of renewable energy, argues Mark Diesendorf. 

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Even under a conservative government, coal-fired electricity has no future and the power of public opinion will force rapid, effective action on climate change, writes Mark Diesendorf.

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Coal-fired electricity may have little or no economic future in Australia, even if carbon capture and storage becomes commercially available, a new analysis has found.

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It's an old myth that renewable energy is unreliable in supplying base-load demand, or that it is unaffordable. All we need are effective policies to drive the transition, writes Mark Diesendorf.

Uniken sepoct2010 cover

When it comes to population there's disagreement about whether big really is better. In the latest issue of Uniken, some of our leading academics enter the debate on a "sustainable Australia".

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