Martin Loosemore

Opal Tower.jpg

Building defects in apartment blocks are far from unusual. We need to identify the systemic flaws contributing to them.

Innovation

The debate about renewable energies following the South Australian blackout is a vivid demonstration of how vested interests can act as a barrier to innovation, writes Martin Loosemore.

16330756551_a5bb35cd6f_k.jpg

In a knowledge-based economy, Australian construction firms need to shift from applied to pure R&D, writes Martin Loosemore. 

8662368246_cb66b63b0a_k.jpg

Problems with measuring and reporting innovation means successes in the construction industry are  obscured, writes Martin Loosemore. 

1_indigenous-entrepreneurship-.jpg

All new enterprises experience barriers to entry into the construction sector. However, recent research has shown that Indigenous businesses face more barriers than most, writes Martin Loosemore.

robot

It was recently estimated by a CEDA report that as many of 40% of Australian jobs are at high risk of redundancy from new technologies, writes Martin Loosemore.

cranes

The construction industry offers many opportunities to further federal government goals of enhancing growth through competition, innovation and entrepreneurship, writes Martin Loosemore.

construction

New free trade deals open the door to more foreign labour entering the Australian construction industry, writes Martin Loosemore.

women-in-construction.jpg

Construction is missing out on a huge untapped source of potential talent by marginalising and disadvantaging potential female employees, writes Martin Loosemore.

Shadow hand bulb

A recent CEDA report found technological advances over the next 10 to 15 years mean 40% of Australia’s workforce faces a high probability of redundancy, writes Martin Loosemore.

Pages