Mary-Louise McLaws

Flinders Street Station in Melbourne

A previous version of Melbourne's COVID roadmap flagged an exclusive bubble between two households. The new plan allows residents to have two adult visitors per day, which is far riskier.

Melbourne sign during lockdown

The Premier said Melbourne's restrictions could be eased more than expected on Monday. But from an outbreak-management perspective, we should be careful of easing too soon.

Group of people chatting at dinner

We have to balance the risk of transmission with the mental health challenges of lockdowns. A bubble system could alleviate loneliness while minimising infection risk.

A doctor draws an injectable vaccine into a syringe

Talk about a mandatory vaccine may not be necessary to get a positive response from the public, two UNSW medical researchers say.

Map of Melbourne and Victoria

Not everyone has a job they can do from home. Mapping the patterns of occupations across Melbourne's suburbs against COVID-19 cases strongly suggests why some parts of the city are more vulnerable.

woman wearing a face mask at Bondi beach

Analysis suggests when COVID-19 cases reach 100 over 14 days, an outbreak gets very difficult to control — as we saw in Victoria. Over the last fortnight, NSW has recorded at least 154 new cases.

Melbourne tram

The best option is for infected people to be admitted to hospitals or other suitable health facilities. This will help prevent transmission within families.

COVID-19 around the world

UNSW Sydney's Professor Mary-Louise McLaws, who is an adviser to the World Health Organisation, says the world will never be the same again following the COVID-19 pandemic.

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While we move soap around, it lifts up invisible oil that holds germs onto your hand.

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They're everywhere in hospitals, travellers' backpacks and the aisles of pharmacies in winter, but do we really need to use alcohol-based hand sanitiser, asks Mary-Louise McLaws.

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