microfactories

Veena Sahajwalla

Waste has got a bad reputation. But when we hold our noses as we scuttle past the bin, we are passing by a world of opportunities. In material science, the idea of a used can, a discarded tyre or a smashed iPhone is a gateway to an untapped world of new products.

kitchen splashback and island bench front made from green ceramics

A new display apartment shows how recycling techniques developed at UNSW Sydney could change the way we build our homes.

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A recycling breakthrough at UNSW Sydney offers new possibilities for the re-purposing of polymer-laminated aluminium products, such as food and coffee packaging.

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We need to rethink our attitudes to the materials we discard and instead see them as renewable resources, says a UNSW leader in recycling who is taking vital new technology to rural NSW cities next week.

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People are losing confidence in recycling and overwhelmingly want government to support solutions such as UNSW's groundbreaking microfactory technology, a new survey shows.