nanotechnology

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Through a program of individualised mentorship, Professor Justin Gooding has trained and developed an all-new breed of research leader in bionanotechnology and nanomedicine.

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When it comes to delivering drugs, nanoparticles shaped like rods and worms are the best bet for making the daunting journey to the centre of a cell, new Australian research suggests.

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A "smart" paper-based patch that changes colour in sunlight could provide an affordable tool to help prevent sunburn and deadly skin cancers, researchers say.

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Major scientific and regulatory barriers are still preventing adequate risk assessments of nanomaterials, write Georgia Miller and Fern Wickson. 

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Her vision is to use nanotechnology to deliver drugs and gene-silencing therapies directly to cancer cells. He is a social scientist with an interest in the social and ethical issues of technological change. 

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UNSW chemists have invented a new type of tiny lab-on-a-chip device that could have a diverse range of applications, including to detect toxic gases, fabricate integrated circuits and screen biological molecules.

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With advances in nanotechnology, the future of medicine is taking shape on the nano-scale and making possible healthcare solutions once confined to the realm of science fiction.

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UNSW international student Colin Cheng has been selected to represent his home country of Singapore in sailing at the London Olympics.

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When it comes to pool, there’s nothing worse than a shonky table: a new study has found the same goes at the nano-scale, where the “billiard balls” are electrons moving across a “table” made of semiconductor gallium arsenide.

New nanotechnology-based treatments, including nerve tissue engineering that draws on the limb-regrowing ability of the axolotl are being discussed at a conference in Sydney.

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