natural disasters

Ilustration of natural disasters including, flood, tsunami and bushfire

The movements of communities across the world due to disaster risks are mapped by new UNSW Sydney research.

heavy flooding from monsoon rain samutprakarn near bangkok thailand

Tackling corruption could help alleviate the scale of crises and its impact on vulnerable people, says international construction management and economics expert Professor George Ofori. 

Kathmandu earthquake

A new research initiative aims to reduce vulnerability in urban environments.

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Professor David Sanderson will steer investigation of the pressing issues of rapid urbanisation, including threats facing low-income urban settlements.

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Japan's response to a tsunami threat following a major earthquake shows it has learned much from past events, including the deadly quake and tsunami that disabled the Fukushima nuclear power plant, writes James Goff.

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When disaster strikes, online communities are lending a hand in sharing information and offering financial support.

drought

Droughts are much bigger and slower than other natural disasters that hit Australia but we still haven't figured out how best to protect ourselves, write Anthony Kiem, Fiona Johnson and Seth Westra.

flood

Researchers have found a disaster "hotspot" in northern New South Wales, where nearly half of the state's most disadvantaged communities are found.

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In the face of unprecedented urban migration, architects have a critical role to play in making our cities more resilient, says international disaster risk-reduction expert David Sanderson.

Bushfire

An innovative 'Resilience Index' that measures the ability of communities to cope with natural disasters, developed by two UNSW Engineering students, has won first-prize in a national competition to address the challenges of climate extremes.

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