natural disasters

Woman face in hands unable to work

From fires, floods and financial ruin, disaster can strike individuals anytime. But how should their workplace respond when it does? 

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UNSW has experts available for analysis and interview on topics including the Ukraine war and the flooding events in eastern Australia.

Woman stands in front of her destroyed home in Vanuatu

As climate change amplifies the frequency and severity of extreme weather events, evacuations are likely to become increasingly common and costly – in human and economic terms.

Ilustration of natural disasters including, flood, tsunami and bushfire

The movements of communities across the world due to disaster risks are mapped by new UNSW Sydney research.

heavy flooding from monsoon rain samutprakarn near bangkok thailand

Tackling corruption could help alleviate the scale of crises and its impact on vulnerable people, says international construction management and economics expert Professor George Ofori. 

Kathmandu earthquake

A new research initiative aims to reduce vulnerability in urban environments.

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Professor David Sanderson will steer investigation of the pressing issues of rapid urbanisation, including threats facing low-income urban settlements.

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Japan's response to a tsunami threat following a major earthquake shows it has learned much from past events, including the deadly quake and tsunami that disabled the Fukushima nuclear power plant, writes James Goff.

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When disaster strikes, online communities are lending a hand in sharing information and offering financial support.

drought

Droughts are much bigger and slower than other natural disasters that hit Australia but we still haven't figured out how best to protect ourselves, write Anthony Kiem, Fiona Johnson and Seth Westra.

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