Nauru

detainees seen inside the park hotel in melbourne holding a sign saying 8 years too long january 2022

Offshore processing is a failed policy that continues to haemorrhage cash, destroy lives and erode the international system for refugee protection.

asylum seekers look through a wire fence at a detention centre

The mounting urgency about asylum seekers trying to reach the UK by boat does not sweep aside the need for reasoned and rational policymaking.

People protesting refugee policy

If history is any guide, the new US president’s forward-thinking approach toward refugee resettlement could help drive Australia’s commitments to refugee protection, too.

The Strait of Hormuz.

States can’t pick and choose when to invoke international law for protection on a particular issue and then ignore, contravene or decry it on other matters.

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The issues that captured the world’s attention this year show the struggle to secure human rights is far from over.

Queensland

Few realise that in the 1960s the Australian government planned to relocate the entire population of Nauru to an island off the Queensland coast, writes Jane McAdam.

Nauru

The muted reaction to reports of abuse of asylum seekers in Nauru suggests many people have become immune to evidence about the harm experienced by refugees, writes Jane McAdam. 

Nauru

The Australian government must respond to the latest reports of abuse in Australia’s offshore processing centre on Nauru as it did with the children detained at Don Dale, write Madeline Gleeson and Khanh Hoang.

 

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A new book by Madeline Gleeson reveals the reality of life for refugees on Manus Island and Nauru. 

Nauru

Both major parties support offshore processing and boat turnbacks. But public opinion is not so clear-cut. And nor are the policy choices, writes Claire Higgins.

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