oceans

earth from space.jpg

Scientists have been researching the source of water on earth for a long time - and believe it came from a combination of two places.

23_artificial_island_shutterstock.jpg

Artificial islands emerging from the oceans are regarded as 'engineering marvels'. But little attention is paid to how these human-made structures affect sea life.

sea wall

We've been building in the sea for centuries, and it's putting our oceans out of balance, write Katherine Dafforn, Mariana Mayer-Pinto and Nathan Waltham.

Japanese fish

Human-made debris such as plastic have vastly increased the numbers of marine species crossing the oceans, write Emma Johnston and Jim Carlton. 

deep sea

We need to ensure that environmental and social safeguards are in place before commercial deep seabed mining operations begin, writes Aline Jaeckel.

Rubbish 2

A new map of the world’s oceans redraws boundaries according to science, not geopolitics, and provides a crucial piece in the puzzle of who is creating marine dumping grounds, write Erik van Sebille and Gary Froyland.

IStock 000019434247Small 1

When a positive Indian Ocean dipole is coupled with an El Niño event, rainfall decreases dramatically across Australia, and such an event could be on the way, write Agus Santoso and Wenju Cai.

Water pollution crop 0

The real and direct impact of ocean-going plastic is not where it ends up, but the route it takes from our beaches to the great ocean garbage patches, writes Erik Van Sebille.

Water pollution crop

The giant garbage patches in our oceans will continue to grow for hundreds of years even if no more is added - and our garbage has made its way into every ocean in the world, according to startling new research.

England matthew web

UNSW Professor Matthew England has received one of the most coveted Australian science awards - The Royal Society of Victoria Research Medal.