offshore processing

detainees seen inside the park hotel in melbourne holding a sign saying 8 years too long january 2022

Offshore processing is a failed policy that continues to haemorrhage cash, destroy lives and erode the international system for refugee protection.

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That no Australian government in almost a decade has successfully brought this policy to a formal close is astonishing. In fact, Australia ceased transferring new arrivals offshore in 2014.

a street protester holds a sign that says free the refugees

The Home Affairs Minister says Australia is exploring resettlement overseas for 'broad cohorts' of people. But such deals do not get Australia off the hook.

person holding up sign

This excessive spending raises serious raise questions about the government's long-term planning for refugees stuck in limbo.

Nauru

Both major parties support offshore processing and boat turnbacks. But public opinion is not so clear-cut. And nor are the policy choices, writes Claire Higgins.

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Without a proper refugee status determination procedure, asylum seekers are left in indefinite detention with no certainty about (or control over) their future, writes Claire Higgins.

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At a cost of A$826 million, the processing and detention of around 2,500 asylum seekers on Nauru and Manus Island is a scandalous waste of taxpayers' money, write Joyce Chia and Claire Higgins.

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On any cogent human rights analysis, it is difficult to see how transferring asylum seeker children to Nauru or PNG would ever be in their best interests, writes Jane McAdam. 

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The Parliament's Joint Committee on Human Rights has found that Australia's regional processing legislation violates many of our human rights obligations. It should act as a wakeup call that we have gone too far, writes Jane McAdam.

In a week when Australians are concerned for a teenage boy in a Bali police cell, our own Parliament may enact a law that could do far worse to asylum seeker children, writes George Williams.