Pro Vice-Chancellor Indigenous

The sun setting on a section of Uluru

Vast majority of public submissions published to date in response to the Indigenous Voice Interim Report support a referendum on an Indigenous Voice to Parliament.

Dancer at the Uluru Constitutional Convention 2017, the Uluru Statement in the Background

The Uluru Dialogue group based at UNSW Indigenous Law Centre says constitutional recognition cannot be dislocated from the idea of a Voice to Parliament.

three indigenous children sitting on a rock and smiling

As a 'Voice' that would allow Indigenous Australians to have a say in parliamentary and government decisions that affect them takes shape, it is vital it be enshrined in our Constitution.

aboriginal flag and australian flag flying at parliament house canberra

There is a quiet process underway, aimed at achieving the recognition of the First Nations that has so far eluded Australia.

Man hanging from a wire

New book explores the people, places and achievements at the centre of Aboriginal activism and self-determination in the 1970s.

Marijke Bassani

Marijke Bassani’s PhD research explores questions of Indigeneity, gender, and sexuality within communities and the legal system.

Silhouette of children playing at sunset

Professor Megan Davis, the author of the independent review into Aboriginal children and young people in out-of-home care, says the government needs to “implement recommendations and announce the way forward”.

Megan Davis portrait

Professor Megan Davis, Pro Vice-Chancellor Indigenous and Professor of Law at UNSW Sydney, has today been named the Balnaves Chair in Constitutional Law.

Aboriginal dancers at Uluru

On the 3rd anniversary of the Uluru Statement from the Heart, Professor Megan Davis says that the coronavirus pandemic highlights the need for a First Nations Voice to Parliament. 

Woman talking to man in a wheelchair

Human rights need to be protected during the coronavirus pandemic, leading academics say.

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