Professor Richard Holden

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Low inflation and painful wage growth mean the Reserve Bank has extended its freeze on interest rates for an almost unprecedented 18th straight meeting. 

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The latest numbers suggest construction is accelerating even as buyers become more hesitant, writes Richard Holden. 

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Data from Australia and overseas, inlcuding the fluctuations in the US stock market, point to a tricky balancing act for policy makers, writes Richard Holden.

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With 2018 likely to see US and Australian interest rates diverge, Australian investors are on the lookout for nascent signs of inflation, writes Richard Holden.

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Cutting company tax rates can help to redress economic inequality and deserves political support, writes Richard Holden.

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Despite employment growth, Australian wages remain stagnant in real terms as the economy starts 2018 with the same mix of positive and negative signs seen in 2017, writes Richard Holden.

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The launch of the national payments platform means that Australia could realistically be cash free by 2020 if it wanted to be, writes Richard Holden.

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With the end of 2017 in sight, Richard Holden looks at five issues to watch for in 2018.

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Australia continues to create jobs, but wages aren’t keeping up and policymakers are running out of options, writes Richard Holden.

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Richard Holden considers how Australia should navigate the current turbulent political and economic climate.

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