Professor Richard Kingsford

Sea horses are among the marine animals that depend on the sea grasses for habitat.

On this year’s International Day of Biodiversity, we are showcasing some of our scientists who are working to safeguard our ecosystems – both far away and close to home.

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UNSW scientists have created a 40-square-kilometre sanctuary for native Australian animals in the Sturt National Park that is completely free of feral animals such as rabbits, foxes and cats.

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In the lead up to the NSW state election, UNSW’s Professor Richard Kingsford outlines what needs to be done to protect the Murray-Darling rivers and the communities that rely on them.

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It is clear what's behind mass fish deaths on the Darling River and the broader destruction of the Murray-Darling river system.

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Scientists are worried about the platypus, with a national risk assessment led by UNSW Professor Richard Kingsford suggesting declines of up to 30%.

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Water is scarce in the Lake Eyre Basin in the heart of Australia. A new book tells the stories of those who love and rely on the Basin's free-flowing rivers and explains why we must protect this vulnerable river system.

 

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The tragedy of the Murray-Darling river system is man-made, writes Richard Kingsford.

Some of the most pressing environmental concerns of our times will be explored in a suite of exhibitions opening at UNSW Galleries this week.

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Eastern Australia's wetlands have dried up in the drought and waterbird numbers have dropped to well below long-term averages, an aerial survey led by UNSW researchers has revealed.

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A team including UNSW ecologist Richard Kingsford has been nominated for the International River Prize, one of the world's most prestigious water conservation awards. 

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