quantum computers

Andrea Morello stands in front of a transparent blackboard to explain Maxwell's Demon

UNSW Sydney research demonstrates a 20x improvement in resetting a quantum bit to its ‘0’ state, using a modern version of the ‘Maxwell’s demon’.

An artist's impression of a silicon chip among lights and colours

UNSW engineers have substantially extended the time that their quantum computing processors can hold information by more than 100 times compared to previous results.

lead researcher michelle simmons

Quantum computing hardware specialists at UNSW have built a quantum processor in silicon to simulate an organic molecule with astounding precision.

Asaad Serwan, Andrea Morello and Mateusz Mądzik among their quantum computing equipment

UNSW Sydney-led research paves the way for large silicon-based quantum processors for real-world manufacturing and application.

Asaad Serwan, Andrea Morello and Mateusz Mądzik among their quantum computing equipment

UNSW Sydney-led research paves the way for large silicon-based quantum processors for real-world manufacturing and application.

Dr Jarryd Pla and Prof. Andrew Dzurak look from behind a transparent screen showing mathematical workings

A decades-old problem about how to reliably control millions of qubits in a silicon quantum computer chip has now been solved.

Henry Yang and Andrew Dzurak

A proof-of-concept published today in Nature promises warmer, cheaper and more robust quantum computing. And it can be manufactured using conventional silicon chip foundries.

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Two fundamental quantum techniques have been combined by a UNSW team in a integrated silicon chip for the first time, confirming the promise of using silicon for quantum computing.

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INGENUITY, a new magazine focusing on the frontiers of engineering research at UNSW and with a global distribution, was launched this week by Dean of Engineering, Mark Hoffman.

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A UNSW-led research team has encoded quantum information in silicon using simple electrical pulses for the first time, bringing affordable large-scale quantum computers one step closer to reality.