Raina MacIntyre

vaccination hub

UNSW researchers have used mathematical simulations of waiting in line, known as stochastic queue network models, to model the process of running a vaccination clinic.

A lightbox with message 'bye bye 2020' alongside two surgical masks

Christmas may not be cancelled, but it will certainly be different to any before, say leading COVID-19 experts.

Young female EMS key worker doctor in front of healthcare ICU facility, wearing protective PPE face mask equipment, holding medical lab patient health check form

A new study estimates how Australian health workers’ risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection differs from that of the broader community.

A video still of someone singing showing the droplets expelled into the air

A study led by Professor Raina MacIntyre raises questions about the risks of infection for people singing in groups, especially in poorly ventilated rooms.

cloth masks on a clothesline

A new publication from researchers at UNSW Sydney recommends daily washing of cloth masks to reduce the likelihood of contamination and transmission of viruses like SARS-CoV-2.

A video still of someone singing showing the droplets expelled into the air

A new study raises questions about the risks of infection for people singing in groups, especially in poorly ventilated rooms.

Woman wearing a face mask walks over a pedestrian crossing in quiet CBD street

UNSW Sydney experts explain the epidemiology definitions you should know before tuning in to another COVID-19 press update – and the ones Australia needs to work on. 

No turning back

It has been described as a once-in-a-century pandemic, but COVID-19 will cause a permanent shift in the way the world operates at the social, political and economic level.

Two people sitting on a bench, social distancing and wearing masks

A UNSW biosecurity expert has featured in a commentary piece in prestigious journal The Lancet, analysing important new WHO-commissioned research.

Healthcare workers

Current advice for COVID-19 health workers is based on the assumption that droplets bearing the virus travel no further than 2 metres and do not remain in the air. The body of published evidence suggests otherwise.

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