RBA

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The impact of ASIC and APRA's response to the findings of the banking royal commission could be a gamechanger in 2018.

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Australia may be celebrating 103 quarters without a recession, but the figures may not be quite as rosy as they first appear.

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Low inflation and painful wage growth mean the Reserve Bank has extended its freeze on interest rates for an almost unprecedented 18th straight meeting. 

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Employment rising, consumer spending growing but wages are still stuck. Therein lies the problem for the Reserve Bank of Australia, writes Richard Holden.

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If former US Treasury Secretary Larry Summers is right, then the unmistakable implication is that the RBA should probably cut rates – perhaps twice – later this year, writes Richard Holden.

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Australia’s economic growth is unsurprisingly paltry, the RBA leaves the cash rate on hold, and Australians continue to eat away at their savings, writes Richard Holden.

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Uncertainty about energy prices and political dithering on company tax rates point to businesses waiting before investing heavily, while the shift to part-time employment continues in Australia, writes Richard Holden. 

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Inflation has been stubbornly low in Australia, and the RBA remains concerned about a high Australian dollar, writes Richard Holden.

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A generation – 25 years – of continuous economic growth in Australia, and some excellent central banking, has led to collective complacency, writes Richard Holden.

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We are still learning the rules of the “secularly stagnant” global economy, and where we might be headed, writes Richard Holden.

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