Rebecca Keogh

Young woman with hand up to face amid distorted reflections

Neuroscientists say the best way to study hallucinations is via lab models where they can be induced in anyone, anytime.

Is your imagination strong, fuzzy or non-existent?

Highly excitable brain neurons in the visual cortex may reduce a person’s ability to visualise things clearly, neuroscience study finds. 

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To determine why some people cannot create visual images of people, places and things in their mind’s eye, UNSW scientists are planning to conduct a world-first brain imaging study of people with this baffling condition, known as congenital aphantasia.

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Rebecca Keogh and Joel Pearson explore congenital aphantasia – the inability to create visual imagery in the mind's eye.