Richard Holden

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Business conditions aren't translating to confidence, despite growing profits and jobs, writes Richard Holden.

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The Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences has been awarded to Richard Thaler, an excellent choice that reflects an important shift in economics over the last three decades, Richard Holden writes.

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The market welcomed statements from the US Federal Reserve and the RBA, but there isn't much to be happy about.

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The US economy looks to be improving but Richard Holden warns that Australia is on shaky ground with low interest rates, high household debt and the Aussie dollar on the rise again.

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Economic data is thin on the ground as central bankers converge on Jackson Hole for their annual meet and greet, writes Richard Holden.

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Employment rising, consumer spending growing but wages are still stuck. Therein lies the problem for the Reserve Bank of Australia, writes Richard Holden.

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Businesses seem confident, consumers less so, China trade slows, Australian housing finance flattens, and the US economy is growing but remains hard to call, writes Richard Holden.

Richard Holden

With slow wages growth it will be hard for households to “de-lever” themselves, writes Richard Holden.

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Why does the Chair of the United States Federal Reserve say another financial crisis is unlikely in our lifetimes, asks Richard Holden.

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The Treasurer's federal bank tax has fired the starting gun on a race-to-the-bottom of the worst kind among the states, writes Richard Holden.

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