Richard Kingsford

wompoo fruit-dove

Australian rainforests and bird communities remain under threat following the catastrophic 2019-2020 bushfire season, new UNSW Sydney research shows.

A white ute with 'Wild Deserts' logo under a starry night sky. Reece Pedler shines a spotlight from the ute into the distance.

For Bec West and Reece Pedler, it’s an overnight journey to buy groceries and a 350-kilometre round trip to take the kids to playgroup. But they wouldn’t have it any other way.

A platypus floats on the top of calm river waters

Environmental survey findings confirm what scientists have suspected; platypuses aren’t in Royal National Park. But plans to reintroduce the iconic species to the park later this year will change this.

Crest-tailed mulgara

This is the project milestone ecologists had been hoping for.

Citizen scientists looking at leaves on a tree

UNSW scientists hope the Big Bushfire BioBlitz will build on the 17,500 observations submitted to the Environment Recovery Project.

The edge of Burdekin Falls Dam

The UNSW scientists observed fewer waterbirds but greater flooding than last year, which they hope will help to offset long-term declines.

Dark gray-blue storm clouds. La nina and superstorm concept.

UNSW has a range of experts available to comment on La Niña.

Small pelican breeding colony on Lake Wyara

For nearly four decades, UNSW scientists, with researchers from the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment and other state agencies, have been surveying Australia’s waterbirds once a year.

A platypus swimming at Taronga Zoo

UNSW Sydney scientists are leading a project to bring the iconic mammal back to Royal National Park after almost 50 years.

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