SARS-CoV-2

woman in a mask on a tram

Australia is in the middle of its fifth Omicron wave, which has been brewing since February. But it’s been slow and the health impacts are very different. 

A young woman asleep sitting upright in a chair

We know from other viruses that viral fragments can remain in different tissues for months or even years. This could be the case for long COVID.

people wear masks on a train in singapore

The evidence so far suggests this wave could be a shorter and smaller version of the Omicron BA.5 wave.

a mother fits a face mask to her young daughter

At times when COVID numbers are increasing, allowing infectious people to mingle freely at work and socially will create epidemic growth and make the crisis even worse.

Artist impression of the COVID-19 virus

Researchers will investigate treatment measures for COVID-19 infection and the aerosol transmission of SARS-COV-2.

COVID-19 vaccine in doctor’s hand close-up, woman in mask holds bottle with vaccine

This is the first and largest study to predict protection against variants using neutralising antibodies.

Delta variant

The Delta variant is likely to become the most dominant strain globally. What does that mean for current and future variants?

Vaccinating children

Experts suggest vaccination of children must be part of Australia’s exit strategy, especially with the Delta variant of the virus.

variant of SARS-CoV-2

Associate Professor Stuart Turville from UNSW Sydney and the Kirby Institute's Immunovirology and Pathogenesis Program explains how variants emerge, how they are detected and what we know about the B.1617 variant.

stuart turville

Associate Professor Stuart Turville from UNSW Sydney’s Kirby Institute leads a team that has developed genetically “supercharged” cells to quickly understand

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