School of BEES

hand prints on wall

It took just 5,000 years for large and well-organised groups of people to populate all corners of the continent.

Big tech apps on mobile phone

New research shows that the variety of online players is shrinking rapidly, although the overall size of the worldwide web continues to expand and functional and geographic opportunities are rising.

Two stalagmites in Yonderup Cave, Yanchep, Western Australia

To look inside a stalagmite is to look back in time tens of thousands of years to see how the Earth’s climate patterns have shaped the world we live in today.

Matthew Baker

A UNSW Sydney researcher has received a prestigious international grant to study the origins of movement in bacteria and its application to present-day biology.

A school of surgeonfish swims over a reef

Warming waters are leading to the ‘tropicalisation’ of temperate reefs: gone are the kelp forests, and local fish populations are responding unexpectedly.

Dingo walking on sand

It’s time to take dingoes out of the doghouse. 

Ferns sprouting after bushfire

UNSW Sydney researchers have shown how a rapid-response citizen science project can provide data on plant, animal and fungus recovery following the 2019/20 mega-fires.

echidna

Excavator, farmer, matchmaker: echidnas provide a host of benefits to nature. So let's harness the potential.

A bat or flying fox spreads its wings above a river

Echolocation evolved multiple times in bats over millions of year. Yet the earliest bat ancestors probably didn't have this skill — or if they did, it was likely very primitive.

Okavango delta

A world-first framework will help identify the ecosystems that are most critical for biodiversity conservation, research, management and human wellbeing.

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