School of BEES

nicky_and_finn_aka_noella_monkey_mia_b.jpg

By considering the environmental (and population) fluctuations that influence wildlife, we can arrive at more sustainable limits to wildlife deaths caused by human activities.

a sassy looking dingo sits on the beach

Citizen science project Dingo? Bingo! can be played immediately to help contribute to dingo research.

wompoo fruit-dove

Australian rainforests and bird communities remain under threat following the catastrophic 2019-2020 bushfire season, new UNSW Sydney research shows.

Pauline Treble and Katie Coleborn in Yonderup Cave

A stalagmite in Western Australia has revealed regular, low-intensity fires before European arrival and infrequent, high-intensity fires afterwards.

A platypus floats on the top of calm river waters

Environmental survey findings confirm what scientists have suspected; platypuses aren’t in Royal National Park. But plans to reintroduce the iconic species to the park later this year will change this.

David Cohen and team soil sampling in broken Hill

Researchers will help find the next generation of mineral deposits after UNSW signed a partner agreement with the MinEx CRC.

humpback whale opens mouth wide to show baleen

Baleen plates – the signature bristle-like apparatus toothless whales use to feed – reveal how these large aquatic mammals adapt to environmental changes over time.

five people ride in on overloaded tinny through flood waters and rain

By following moisture from the oceans to the land, researchers worked out exactly how three oceans conspire to deliver deluges of rain to eastern Australia.

Sandbags protect a local business as flood water washes by

UNSW experts available to comment on flooding and record rain across NSW and Queensland.

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