School of Psychology

Two skeleton Halloween decorations in neon light

The link between mental imagery and emotions may be closer than we thought.

Young woman with hand up to face amid distorted reflections

Neuroscientists say the best way to study hallucinations is via lab models where they can be induced in anyone, anytime.

Gas bubbles in ice sample

The most-read stories of 2020 take us from the depths of the mind to the edges of the universe.

Personal possessions almost stacked to the ceiling of a house

Hoarding is a recognised mental health condition and should be treated as such – without the stigma associated with high-profile cases seen in the media, a UNSW clinical psychologist says.

A collage of faces

Psychologists are hoping the UNSW Face Test will help unearth more of Australia’s top performers in facial recognition, known as super-recognisers.

Pink origami elephant on black background

Why is it so hard to control our thoughts? New research led by UNSW Sydney shows suppressed thoughts could be hiding in the visual part of our brains – without us even knowing.

A young woman involved in a conversation looks to the side

New research suggests people with autism may not have as much difficulty imagining the thoughts of others as previously believed.

House with a face

Face pareidolia – the phenomenon of seeing faces in everyday objects – uses the same brain processes that we use to recognise and interpret other ‘real’ human faces.

Early 20th Century brain model

Aphantasia – being blind in the mind’s eye – may be linked to more cognitive functions than previously thought, new research from UNSW Sydney shows.

Dr Georgie Fleming conducting an I-PCIT session

A real-world trial has tested the effectiveness – and revealed the challenges – of adapting behavioural therapy to the online world.

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