School of Psychology

A researcher on one side of a one-way glass uses a microphone to give directions to a parent with her child

Children with callous unemotional traits can learn to be more prosocial, a study has shown.

gamer holding a controller playing a shooter game in the background

Researchers from UNSW Sydney help us understand why the genre is so popular.

Four women walking as exercise

When Maree was given flowers by a TikTok influencer, she felt ‘de-humanised’ and reduced to her age. Here is how benevolent ageism shows up in our society.

sad woman sitting alone in a cafe excluded from the group

Humans are programmed on an evolutionary level to fear social rejection, but we can learn to deal with it. 

young woman sitting down looking out at the ocean

The reality of climate change has many people feeling uncertain about the environment and our future.

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Sylvia Gustin’s research will facilitate spinal cord injury cure and improve therapies for chronic pain.

a close up of a woman's eyeball looking straight ahead

Picture this, if you will: Aphantasia can be detected with an eye-opening look into our pupils.

young woman confused expression with arms and hands raised

More than two years into the pandemic the world is a very different place. But this only partly explains different people’s responses to COVID.

Portrait of senior lady

Psychologists find evidence that while ageing results in overall cognitive decline, we become better at positively reframing distressing episodes.

kate fasse in front of an illustration of floating pills and medicines

Is it possible that up to half the side effects reported in medical trials are all in people's heads? Is someone's expectation of a negative side effect strong enough to make it actually happen? And if so, how do medical researchers break this dangerous cycle?

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