space

Satellites in orbit of planet Earth

Shrinking satellites are making it cheaper and more accessible to do science in space.

people watching projector with visualisation of earth

The future of Australia’s space efforts will hinge on coordination between defence, industry and universities.

Space Debris

Humans have left an absolute mess in space but no one wants to clean it up.

Artist's conceptual picture of phosphine in the atmosphere of Venus.

To confirm life on other planets, we need to detect far more molecules in their atmospheres than we currently do to rule out non-biological chemical processes.

Artist's impression of the rocky terrain and lava rivers on the surface of Gliese 486b

A rocky planet discovered in the Virgo constellation could change how we look for life in the universe.

A view of Earth from the moon.

Researchers have long suspected there's water - or ice, to be precise - on the Moon. New research now confirms it, and suggests it lurks in sun-starved nooks and crannies called 'cold traps'.

Artist's interpretation of a protoplanetary disk

At only 1 per cent the age of the Sun, the DS Tuc binary system shows us how a planet might naturally develop before its orbit is disturbed by external forces.

shipyard urbancloud.png

Internationally acclaimed architect, urban designer, UNSW alumna Zhizhe Yu explores a multi-planetary and people-centric approach to high-rise urbanism.

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The galaxy is rich in grease-like molecules, according to an Australian-Turkish team.

Australia from space.jpg

New jobs and investment for Australia's growing space industry are promised with the backing of the new space agency. It's hoped that all states and territories will benefit from a national approach.

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