suicide

Children and adolescents with mental illness facing hospitalisation

UNSW Sydney contributes to guidelines which indicate when children and adolescents should be treated in psychiatric hospitals.

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A new study by UNSW Sydney researchers has explored half a century of research into the suicide rates of people discharged from hospital after they presented with suicidal thoughts or behaviours.

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A major Australian study shows that most people who died of suicide dismissed expressing suicidal thoughts to health professionals, prompting calls to review the way treatment is managed and resourced. 

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Even many years after discharge, people who have been psychiatric inpatients have suicide rates about 30 times higher than the rate of the general community, new research finds.

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Next-of-kin are the most likely to be aware of a loved one's suicide plans, yet in a quarter of cases studied there was no communication between them and health professionals treating the person who died.

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Suicide will continue to be the main cause of death for Australians aged 15 to 44 unless proven prevention strategies are implemented, according to the Black Dog Institute.

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Is sharing a selfie on Facebook an effective way to stop someone who is seriously considering taking their life? The truth is, we really don't know writes Helen Christensen.

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In front of a full house at Leighton Hall at UNSW, former Director of the US National Institute of Mental Health Dr Tom Insell discusses tthe emerging global health emergency posed by mental illness and suicide, and how the public and news media seem unaware of the immensity of the statistics and

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The world is facing a global health emergency as the rates of mental illness and suicide increase, one of the world’s foremost mental health experts, Dr Tom Insel, has told a packed audience at UNSW’s Wallace Wurth lecture.

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An Australian study has found suicide risk assessments of mental health patients give results only slightly better than chance, prompting calls for a review of the way treatment resources are allocated.

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