Tracey Rogers

Tasmanian devil stepping out of a hessian bag

They are the only known scavengers in the world to have picky diets.

A Tasmanian devil looking up, showcasing its long whiskers

I know what you did last summer: chemical clues in the marsupial’s whiskers can reveal what they ate months – and even seasons – ago.

Pygmy blue whale swimming

It was the whales’ singing that gave them away.

Humpback whale breaks the water's surface

UNSW researchers have linked the burden of humpback whales’ annual migration to depleted microbial diversity in their airways – an indicator of overall health.

whale_shutterstock.jpg

The bigger the animal, the deeper the sound they make. But not if they live in the water.

Tasmanian Devil

Some animals bred in captivity often lack the skills needed to survive in the wild but the Tasmanian devil is showing it's a natural born killer, writes Tracey Rogers.

whale

Humpback whales have been spotted fending off killer whales from attacking other species. But this kind of interspecies altruism raises an evolutionary conundrum, writes Tracey Rogers.

Eureka Prizes inside

UNSW has a record-breaking 11 finalists in the running for Australia's premier science awards, the Australian Museum Eureka Prizes.