UNSW Business School

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With 2018 likely to see US and Australian interest rates diverge, Australian investors are on the lookout for nascent signs of inflation, writes Richard Holden.

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UNSW Business School has become the first Australian member of the Global Network for Advanced Management, a network of top business schools committed to educating global leaders.

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AGSM @ UNSW Business School is Australia's leading graduate school of management and among the world’s top 100, according to the latest Financial Times (UK) 2018 Global MBA Rankings.

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The World Economic Forum’s annual meeting in the Swiss resort town of Davos has become a bit like the Academy Awards but it remains important for the Australian economy, writes Richard Holden.

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Cryptocurrencies could lead to significant losses in tax revenue, write Richard Holden and Anup Malani.

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Despite employment growth, Australian wages remain stagnant in real terms as the economy starts 2018 with the same mix of positive and negative signs seen in 2017, writes Richard Holden.

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The launch of the national payments platform means that Australia could realistically be cash free by 2020 if it wanted to be, writes Richard Holden.

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The odds are that we get through 2018 without war, mass capital flight, or a housing crash. But all the risks are medium probability, warns Richard Holden, and the consequences could be dire.

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Troubling borrowing and lending markers in the Australian housing market suggest that the lessons from the US mortgage meltdown have not been learned, writes Richard Holden.

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Australia continues to see mixed signals across different aspects of the economic spectrum, writes Richard Holden.

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