UNSW Law

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Tony Abbott's conservative manifesto proposal for governments to bypass the Senate is a step too far in the balance of federal power, writes George Williams.

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The recent forced removal of homeless people from a camp in central Sydney raises some difficult questions, writes Amelia Thorpe.

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Claiming to act on behalf of a terrorist network is not enough to amount to terrorism, writes George Williams.

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Technology is rapidly changing the legal profession so lawyers need to focus on what they can provide that a machine cannot, writes Michael Legg. 

Kiribati

We need to think more creatively about pre-emptive responses to displacement linked to the impacts of climate change and disasters, writes Jane McAdam.

Aboriginal flag

Mabo forced us to confront the convenient fiction upon which Australia was built, writes George Williams.

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Proceeds of crime are covered by federal and state laws, both of which could apply in a case like that of Schapelle Corby, writes Nicholas Cowdery.

Indigenous

Indigenous Australians have issued a statement calling for constitutional reform that is substantive and meaningful. So what come next, asks Harry Hobbs.

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Within a year of troops landing at Gallipoli in April 1915, it had become an offence to use the word Anzac – or even a word similar to it – in trade or business. The impact has been chronicled in a new book by UNSW Law's Catherine Bond.

corruption

While public hearings may encourage some witnesses to approach an anti-corruption commission, others may be deterred, write Gabrielle Appleby and Grant Hoole.

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