UNSW Medicine & Health

Unidentifiable patients receive chemotherapy treatment in a hospital

A low haemoglobin count, older age and high BMI are possible risk factors for developing nerve damage after cancer treatment, a UNSW-led study has found.

UNSW Students

Teachers from UNSW Business School, Engineering and Medicine & Health have been awarded citations for outstanding contributions to student learning at the 2020 Australian Awards for University Teaching.

Professor Paul Timpson; Professor David Thomas; Associate Professor Phoebe Phillips and Professor David Goldstein; and Associate Professor Marina Pajic.

UNSW Sydney and the Garvan Institute of Medical Research researchers will lead the program, thanks to a $3.75 million grant from the Cancer Institute NSW.

Two baby mice in a teacup

A new microchip could help scientists uncover secrets of heart regeneration in baby mice.

An ill child lies in a hospital bed attached to a medical device

A rise in vaccine-resistant bacteria shows the need for a new vaccine to fight childhood empyema after a spike in hospitalisations, a new UNSW study reveals.

YourIVFSuccess launch

YourIVFSuccess, a UNSW-developed website, enables patients to calculate their chance of IVF success.

A collection of colourful charity ribbons signifying cancer awareness, pictured with a stethoscope.

This World Cancer Day, a range of UNSW Medicine & Health cancer researchers, clinicians and scientists are available for media interviews across all aspects of cancer, from prevention and detection to treatment and survivorship.

A colourful digital illustration of the human gut microbiome

People with non-alcohol-related liver cancer have a unique gut microbiome profile which could help predict disease risk, a UNSW Sydney study has found.

Healthcare workers transport a patient on a hospital bed between hospital buildings.

A new modelling study led by UNSW predicts demand for cancer surgery will rise by 52 per cent within two decades, with low-income countries bearing the greatest burden.

Unmarked bottles of vaccines and a syringe

The best approach for protecting everyone’s health will require us to provide different vaccines to different people according to need and availability.

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