UNSW Science

Eureka

UNSW scientists working on quantum computing, marine science and threatened ecosystems have won three prestigious Australian Museum Eureka Prizes.

David White

The first study to test the skills of FBI agents and other law enforcers who have been trained in facial recognition has provided a reassuring result – they perform better than the average person or even computers on this difficult task.

Evolution of the backside

Let's get to the bottom of the story. Just why did human backsides become the shape they are? And what purpose do they serve? Find out in the latest episode of our evolution series: How Did We Get Here?

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A UNSW alumnus investigating materials that could dramatically improve carbon dioxide capture and enable more efficient hydrogen-powered vehicles is making waves at the CSIRO. 

Michelle Simmons

Leading UNSW female scientists discuss their research and passion for science in a video produced for the Celebrating Women in Science Leadership symposium held at UNSW last week.  

nuclear bomb

The Fukishima nuclear disaster in Japan leached radioactive particles into the ocean. UNSW climate scientists are using them as a tracer to understand more about the health of our oceans. Bomb traces and fluerocarbons also have a story to tell.

children science

What do we need to do to get more young people interested in science, asks Merlin Crossley.

Nurul Ibrahim

Drivers who use hand-held or hands-free mobile phones are up to nine times more likely to be involved in a crash. Could in-built voice control be the solution? UNSW transport safety researcher Nurul Ibrahim wants to find out.

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Old race categories like ‘pygmy’ or ‘Negrito’ are simply incapable of doing our evolutionary history justice, writes Darren Curnoe.

Thug face

Are people with shorter, wider faces really more dangerous? The short answer is yes, but only for men.

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