Veena Sahajwalla

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Creating new materials from waste products is essential if we’re to solve the global recycling, waste and emissions crisis.

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UNSW sustainability innovator Professor Veena Sahajwalla will lead a new centre energising the circular economy in NSW. 

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The Times Higher Education Research Excellence Summit: Asia Pacific at UNSW Sydney challenged university leaders and researchers to better showcase how they are tackling the world’s major challenges.

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We need to rethink our attitudes to the materials we discard and instead see them as renewable resources, says a UNSW leader in recycling who is taking vital new technology to rural NSW cities next week.

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UNSW Sydney's Professor Veena Sahajwalla is leading a team producing high-quality building products made from old clothing and mixed waste glass.

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Throwing away clothing that's no longer needed is a missed opportunity to turn the fabrics into new products such as building materials.

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Scientia Professor Veena Sahajwalla's work to revolutionise recycling via groundbreaking technologies developed at UNSW is being heard by a new, younger audience.

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Waste microfactories can transform the manufacturing landscape in Australia, especially in remote locations where waste transportation and processing are expensive.

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People are losing confidence in recycling and overwhelmingly want government to support solutions such as UNSW's groundbreaking microfactory technology, a new survey shows.

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For their outstanding research on psychological responses to trauma, recycling science, and nanomaterials, three UNSW scientists have been elected as Fellows of the Australian Academy of Science.

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