Vital signs

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Data from Australia and overseas, inlcuding the fluctuations in the US stock market, point to a tricky balancing act for policy makers, writes Richard Holden.

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With 2018 likely to see US and Australian interest rates diverge, Australian investors are on the lookout for nascent signs of inflation, writes Richard Holden.

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The World Economic Forum’s annual meeting in the Swiss resort town of Davos has become a bit like the Academy Awards but it remains important for the Australian economy, writes Richard Holden.

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Despite employment growth, Australian wages remain stagnant in real terms as the economy starts 2018 with the same mix of positive and negative signs seen in 2017, writes Richard Holden.

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Australia continues to see mixed signals across different aspects of the economic spectrum, writes Richard Holden.

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With the end of 2017 in sight, Richard Holden looks at five issues to watch for in 2018.

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Australia continues to create jobs, but wages aren’t keeping up and policymakers are running out of options, writes Richard Holden.

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Business conditions aren't translating to confidence, despite growing profits and jobs, writes Richard Holden.

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Richard Holden explains why central banks can't deal with simultaneous low unemployment and inflation.

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There are signs our frothy housing market, combined with rising interest rates, could have serious consequences for our economy, writes Richard Holden.

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