waterbirds

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A 30-year-long UNSW study of wetlands in eastern Australia has found that construction of dams and diversion of water from the Murray-Darling Basin have led to a more than 70 percent decline in waterbird numbers.

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Calling all citizen scientists! Get involved with ANSTO and UNSW's Feathermap of Australia project, collect feathers from waterbird habitats, send them in for for analysis and help protect Australia's wetlands.

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This year’s annual waterbird survey by UNSW scientists coincides with concerns that the Murray-Darling Basin Authority is about to announce a cut to water allocations to the environment.

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Photographer Nick Cubbin has captured the often-overlooked beauty of waterbird feathers for a project that aims to plot the movements of Australia’s wetland birds.

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Knowing the movements of waterbirds helps identify wetlands that are important habitats. But traditional tracking methods have had limited success and can be expensive, so we've developed a more effective way, writes Kate Brandis.

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Australians are being asked to collect wetland bird feathers to help scientists create the first ‘Feather Map of Australia’ to show the health of our wetland birds.

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Eastern Australia's wetlands have dried up in the drought and waterbird numbers have dropped to well below long-term averages, an aerial survey led by UNSW researchers has revealed.

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An aerial survey of waterbirds in eastern Australia covering about a third of the continent is underway for another year, led by UNSW's Richard Kingsford.

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UNSW researchers have identified Australia’s most important wetlands for waterbirds, following one of the most extensive aerial surveys of its kind in the world.