wildlife

Ferns sprouting after bushfire

Citizen scientists are being encouraged to photograph bushfire-affected areas to help UNSW Sydney researchers track the recovery of flora and fauna after the fires.

Sea ice

This year's most popular science stories took readers from melting Antarctic ice sounding the alarm on microbes and climate change, to a pest-proof fence to protect native wildlife in far western NSW, and early signs of life in ancient rocks in the Pilbara, WA.

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It is possible to have fish and dams: John Harris, Bill Peirson and Richard Kingsford explain how.

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Wildlife photography acts as a torch, shining a light onto the face of extinction so that extraordinary species are not lost to the darkness. But it is then up to the rest of us to act and make a change, writes Dustin Welbourne. 

Merlin op ed

The city is teeming with wildlife, so look and listen, urges Merlin Crossley.

Chimp crop

Automated cameras and microphones will help better connect the public with life in the wild, writes Dustin Welbourne.

Fox web

UNSW scientists are raising concerns over the unpredictable nature of a contraceptive vaccine that aims to control populations of wild animals, such as rabbits and foxes.