workplace

Calm employee takes a deep breath and pauses from work

Prevention is a crucial aspect of addressing mental health in the workplace, and it starts with organisational culture, says UNSW Business School's Frederik Anseel.

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While the jury is still out on whether Australia will experience a ‘great resignation’, another trend is already sweeping through the ranks of women, says a UNSW Business School academic. 

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Some employees still feel the need to disguise themselves to ‘survive’ certain work cultures, say UNSW Business School academics.

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2021 has been a massive year for stories in business, with record levels of government debt, employees continuing to work from home, and groundbreaking creative digital innovations.

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With massive job losses and uncertainty a recent memory for Australia’s casual workforce, will they be willing to return to a working situation that treated them so poorly in the pandemic?

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Organisations need to adopt a specific approach to hybrid working in order to improve collaboration, communication, productivity and innovation.

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As we embark on Mental Health Week 2021 and begin to emerge from months of lockdown, employee mental health is at risk. But there are ways to reinforce psychological safety, says UNSW Business School's Frederik Anseel.

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Hybrid workplaces have benefits – and challenges – for different people, just like offices do. Everyone needs to be catered for, say UNSW Business School academics.

A woman on a video call with her colleagues.

There are a number of important lessons for leaders who are looking to maximise productivity and engagement with employees who work from home, says UNSW Business School.

Close-up of an employee cycling down the street to a work hub

The dramatic changes to the workforce brought about by organisational responses to COVID-19 are only likely to accelerate the shift to smart cities, say experts at UNSW Sydney.

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