$46 million for medical research

Research into snakebite venom, the role of sex hormones in schizophrenia, and ways to reduce smoking rates in socioeconomically disadvantaged groups has won UNSW more than $46 million in federal government health funding.

Studies into the effects of snakebite venom on the brain, the role of sex hormones in schizophrenia, and ways to reduce smoking rates in socioeconomically disadvantaged groups, have won major backing in the latest round of medical research funding.

UNSW received more than $46 million in grants from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). The round delivered more than $673 million to medical researchers around the country.

One of the largest Project Grants - $1.97 milion - went to Professor Richard Mattick, from the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, for a randomised controlled trial of a financial counselling intervention and smoking cessation assistance to reduce smoking in socioeconomically disadvantaged
groups.

Another large grant - $1.5 million - went to a team led by Associate Professor Elizabeth Comino, from the Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity for their ongoing work in The Gudaga Study, which investigates the health, development, early education, family environment and service context of Aboriginal children in Sydney's south-west.

In the same funding round, Dr Kim Delbaere, from the School of Public Health and Community Medicine, received $559,000 through the Australian-European Collaborative Research Scheme to develop technologies that will monitor and prevent falls among the frail.

For more information about UNSW's 48 successful project grants and other funding, go to the NHMRC website.