Business & Law

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Legal aid is a crucial element of a fair and efficient justice system founded on the rule of law – and in the case of asylum seekers, it may be the difference between life and death, writes Jane McAdam.

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Proponents of the 'right to be a bigot' are keen to ignore the historical contexts which gave birth to hate speech – something which minority groups should never forget, writes Fergal Davis.

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Australia could benefit substantially from the opening up of China’s capital markets, but this will require changes in policy settings and increased market awareness, a new report from UNSW's Centre for International Finance and Regulation has found.

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The Coalition has dug itself into a deep hole before its proposed changes to the Racial Discrimination Act are even considered, writes Andrew Lynch. 

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By abolishing the independent monitor of Australia's anti-terrorism laws, the Abbott government is choosing to ignore evidence of how far the laws overreach, writes George Williams. VIDEO 

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A recent constitutional challenge to parts of Queensland's anti-bike laws provides the High Court with a platform to clarify how fundamental values are protected from legislative infringement, writes Rebecca Ananian-Welsh.  

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UNSW Law has announced the recipients of the generous John M Green and Ngoc Tram Nguyen scholarships, which help high achievers study at university regardless of their background.

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AGSM Director Professor Chris Styles has been appointed Dean of the Australian School of Business at UNSW. He will replace Professor Geoffrey Garrett, who has been appointed Dean of the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Party solidarity counts for little in the federalism sphere, and Tony Abbott's white paper may not go far enough in changing the settings and entrenched behaviours in Commonwealth-state relations, writes Andrew Lynch. 

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We can only consider the possibility of a universal constitution for the internet when we acknowledge the impact public and private choices have on shaping the web, write Lyria Bennett Moses and David Vaile.  

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