Business & Law

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The recent High Court decision regarding native title rights in Western Australia has reminded governments that accepting coexistence might be wiser than insisting on extinguishment, writes Sean Brennan. 

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The Privacy Commissioner's expanded powers to enforce the Act, including penalties for serious breaches, will be of limited value unless their use is transparent and visible, writes Graham Greenleaf. 

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If the Commission of Audit wants to paint the true picture it needs to subject tax deductions, rebates and exemptions to the same standard of scrutiny applied to other expenditures, writes Dale Boccabella. 

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The historical record shows that no party has a monopoly on human rights reform. It also shows that every government has, at some point, deserved criticism for breaching human rights, argues George Williams. 

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One neglected corner of the gender and work debate is that of female academics – the women who teach the new generation of leaders, produce valuable research and thought leadership, writes Renee Adams. 

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What’s next for Qantas? A great deal of uncertainty about its ownership, operational structure and the possibility of support from government. The only certainty is that 5,000 staff will lose their jobs, writes Richard Holden. 

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Does the decision by China's Twitter-like internet giant Weibo, to list on the New York Stock Exchange, mean Hong Kong has lost its competitive edge, asks Laurie Pearcey. 

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While Australia might "contract out" the processing of asylum seekers to other countries, it cannot "contract out" its legal responsibilities towards them, writes Jane McAdam. 

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Giving cabinet documents to a royal commission creates a precedent that could do long-term harm to our system of government and create a cycle of tit-for-tat inquiries at enormous cost to the taxpayer, writes George Williams. 

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After 9/11, there were two kinds of lawyer: those who betrayed the rule of law, and those who were inspired to its defence, according to UCLA Professor Richard Abel, who delivers the 2014 Hal Wootten Lecture tonight.

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