Business & Law

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The historical record shows that no party has a monopoly on human rights reform. It also shows that every government has, at some point, deserved criticism for breaching human rights, argues George Williams. 

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One neglected corner of the gender and work debate is that of female academics – the women who teach the new generation of leaders, produce valuable research and thought leadership, writes Renee Adams. 

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What’s next for Qantas? A great deal of uncertainty about its ownership, operational structure and the possibility of support from government. The only certainty is that 5,000 staff will lose their jobs, writes Richard Holden. 

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Does the decision by China's Twitter-like internet giant Weibo, to list on the New York Stock Exchange, mean Hong Kong has lost its competitive edge, asks Laurie Pearcey. 

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While Australia might "contract out" the processing of asylum seekers to other countries, it cannot "contract out" its legal responsibilities towards them, writes Jane McAdam. 

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Giving cabinet documents to a royal commission creates a precedent that could do long-term harm to our system of government and create a cycle of tit-for-tat inquiries at enormous cost to the taxpayer, writes George Williams. 

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After 9/11, there were two kinds of lawyer: those who betrayed the rule of law, and those who were inspired to its defence, according to UCLA Professor Richard Abel, who delivers the 2014 Hal Wootten Lecture tonight.

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Are financial advisors under a Coalition government about to win even more freedom in the way they are remunerated, ask Dimity Kingsford Smith and Viroshan Poologasundram.

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If the government succeeds in scrapping complementary protection laws for asylum seekers important checks and balances will be removed, and enormous inefficiencies created in a system that is already choked, writes Jane McAdam.

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With just seven members, the outcomes of judicial deliberation on the High Court can be affected by a single change in its ranks, writes Andrew Lynch.

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